Archive for September, 2016

September 21, 2016   Posted by: Indy

How would you explain logistics to a 5 Year Old ?

Your toys and clothes are made far away. They’re put in big metal boxes that go on ships across the ocean. I work with my team to make sure there’s space for our customers’ boxes on those ships.

Inna Kuznetsova
President and COO, INTTRA

 

I talk on the phone a lot to companies with trucks. I help them figure out the best trucks to use and the fastest way to (safely!) drive them so people like your parents can get the things they want on time, like a new TV, kitchen table, or PlayStation game for you.

Paul Johnson
VP, Global Solutions Consulting Descartes

Imagine using your iPad to talk to other people in the world who are buying your favorite toy. My job is to let you talk about your toy constantly and if you had a problem, ask them how to get it fixed.

Tania Seary
Founding Chairman, Procurious

My job is to help people find, pick up, and move boxes.

Eric Allais
President and CEO
PathGuide Technologies, Inc.

We move everything but people.

Brandon Stallard
CEO, TPS Logistics

Imagine that all the yummy snack food you like to eat is being made and kept in different places all over the country. I call the people who make the snacks and ask when it is ready and then take it to the grocery store where you can buy it. I get the person who is driving with the snacks ready with all the right information. I then call and make sure someone will be at the grocery store ready to put the snacks on the shelves. I do all of this as fast as I can to make sure the snacks you want are always in the store where you’re shopping.

Samantha Wickman
Logistics Consultant, Zipline Logistics

When the ice cream truck comes to your neighborhood, my job is to make sure that you and everyone else on your street get treats on time without having to wait too long. I map out the most efficient route and make sure that the truck is properly stocked and well refrigerated so that if you want an ice cream sandwich, and your friend wants a popsicle, we have enough of both when you reach the window and they are just as you expected (frozen, never thawed, not smashed).

Jon Wiederecht
Director of Lean Enterprise & Operations
ModusLink

Courtesy : Inbound Logistics
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September 5, 2016   Posted by: Indy

The implications for shippers and importers of Hanjin’s bankruptcy

Until very recently, Hanjin Shipping was South Korea’s largest and one of the world’s top ten container carriers.

Hanjin is filing for court bankruptcy protection in about 10 countries, including Canada, Germany and the U.K. this week and later expand that to 43 jurisdictions to protect its ships and other assets from being seized by creditors, and the company is taking further legal action in countries beyond the U.S. for protection of its assets as it works to get a frozen supply chain moving again, with more than half its vessels stranded in ports world-wide and at sea.

Hanjin ships have been seized by creditors or turned away from ports, with terminals refusing to work with the company’s cargo for fear they won’t get paid. Analysts say Hanjin should seek to file for bankruptcy protection as quickly as possible in the jurisdictions it operates in to get ships back to port and containers unloaded.

Chinese ports and terminals that accepted Hanjin ships before the company announced bankruptcy proceedings are charging container-handling deposits of up to $1,800, say freight agents. Seven Hanjin ships remain stranded outside Chinese ports.

Hanjin is the largest shipping company in Korea, operating about 60 regular lines world-wide and transporting over 100 million tons of cargo a year, according to court papers. Its failure would be the largest in the history of the container-shipping industry, dwarfing all previous carrier bankruptcies.

Hanjin’s bankruptcy filing has sent spot shipping rates soaring by as much as 40% on routes from Asia to the Americas, according to analysts.

A crane carries a container from a ship of Hanjin Shipping at Hanjin container terminal at the Busan New Port in Busan, about 420 km (261 miles) southeast of Seoul in this August 8, 2013 file photo. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won/File Photo
A tangle of costs and authorizations stands between shippers and Hanjin Shipping cargo – as below a brief summary of  how much US ports and marine terminals are charging shippers to release stranded Hanjin Shipping containers.

On the West Coast, terminal operators in Los Angeles and Long Beach are unloading all of the containers from the vessels. Containers that do not belong to Hanjin are processed according to normal procedures and terminals are holding onto import loads in Hanjin containers and will deliver the containers to truckers only if the beneficial cargo owners pay the terminal cargo-handling charges upfront. The terminals are not accepting Hanjin export loads and empty containers.

At the Northwest Seaport Alliance of Seattle and Tacoma there were no Hanjin vessels in port on Friday, according to spokesperson Tara Mattina. The Hanjin Scarlet is due to arrive at Terminal 46 in Seattle on Saturday, although the schedule may not hold up. As of Friday, the was anchored outside Prince Rupert, British Columbia, where its entry was refused, she said.

Terminal 46 is now accepting import containers, but is not accepting export loads and empties. Olympic Container Terminal in Tacoma is not accepting any Hanjin deliveries for now and the Husky Terminal is not accepting exports or empties, but is unloading imports and is encouraging truckers to bring their own chassis, Mattina said.

In Vancouver, Global Container Terminal said it will no longer receive Hanjin ships. One Hanjin ship is at the port waiting to be moved on.

On the East Coast, the largest terminal in the Port of New York and New Jersey, Maher Terminals, has made no statement on if, or how much, shippers must pay to get Hanjin containers. However, the terminal has told customers that Hanjin import deliveries must be pre-paid and that Hanjin exports won’t be accepted. One motor carrier advised he was required to pay $395.20 per container to cover stevedoring charges before he could remove a Hanjin box from the terminal.

Maher is the only New York-New Jersey terminal that receives Hanjin ships, and APM Terminals, Port Newark Container Terminal, and Global Container Terminals didn’t disclose how they are handling Hanjin containers.

Down the coast in Baltimore, Ports America Chesapeake, which operates the Seagirt Terminal in Baltimore didn’t disclose how it’s handling already received Hanjin containers. The terminal did say it will not accept any inbound Hanjin cargo, and they will continue receiving but not delivering Hanjin empty containers. The Maryland Port Administration said a barge loaded with Hanjin containers is sitting in the port.

At the Port of Virginia, Hanjin export containers may be picked-up at the terminals by the original shipper only with authorization from Hanjin. In these occurrences, all terminal service charges shall be waived and the shipper will be responsible for all associated chassis charges and fees. All import containers on terminal by Tuesday with the appropriate documentation will be available per normal policy. Starting Wednesday the charge to release Hanjin import containers will be $325, but all demurrage charges will be waived and shippers must have authorization from Hanjin.

At the Port of Wilmington, North Carolina, a Hanjin ship, Seaspan Efficiency, left late Tuesday and cargo from the vessel is being stored at the port. “North Carolina Ports will deliver all import loads and receive back all empties (originally discharged and currently at the Port of Wilmington), including Hanjin Shipping containers,” said a spokesperson.

Further south, the South Carolina Ports Authority has waived the non-vessel delivery fee for export loads out-gated and all import loads discharged on or after September 1 will be placed on hold until such time as all SCPA charges are settled. The South Carolina Ports Authority will collect all port and throughput charges totaling $350 per container from the BCO/responsible party with authorization required from Hanjin. This process will be further refined, but payment is required prior to manual release of hold and outgate.

The Georgia Ports Authority, which oversees the second-largest port on the East Coast, Savannah, wasn’t available to comment, nor was Port Miami. The Port of Jacksonville said it does not have any calls from Hanjin or other CKYHE Alliance members.

Along the Gulf Coast, Houston is holding containers until they receive $100 to cover the Port of Houston Authority’s terminal throughput charges, which are separate from stevedoring costs. The port authority is considering whether to also require guarantees or payment for stevedoring bills for Hanjin boxes that will be discharged from a China Cosco Shipping vessel expected in next week.

Mobile only had three Hanjin containers at the terminal so the operator there, APMT, is checking with the individual customers to see how they would like to proceed. New Orleans, like Jacksonville, has no Hanjin or other CKYHE calls.

Hanjin’s unprecedented bankruptcy will have a significant impact on the cost and effectiveness of all container shipping routes worldwide, so please contact your forwarder to confirm how this may affect you !

Courtesy : WSJ, JOC, CBS, BBC, Reuters

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